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Blog Posts containing "John 13:34"

Year C Twenty-Seventh Sunday After Pentecost Meditation

“All sins shall be forgiven and whatever blasphemies they utter, but whoever blasphemes against the Holy Spirit will never be forgiven; they are guilty of an eternal sin.” Mark 3:28-29 Those seeking a literal answer ask, “What is the unforgivable sin?”  Read more


Year C Twenty-Sixth Sunday After Pentecost Meditation

“Then came to Him certain of the Sadducees who deny that there is any resurrection” What we are thinking is irrelevant. How we are thinking is relevant. The lesson today is an example of the fact that literal thinking trying to get rational answers to spiritual questions is irrelevant. Only spiritual thinking can get grace answers concerning spiritual questions.  Read more


Year C Twenty-Fifth Sunday After Pentecost Meditation

“Then came to Him certain of the Sadducees who deny that there is any resurrection” What we are thinking is irrelevant. How we are thinking is relevant. The lesson today is an example of the fact that literal thinking trying to get rational answers to spiritual questions is irrelevant. Only spiritual thinking can get grace answers concerning spiritual questions.  Read more


Year C Twenty-Fourth Sunday After Pentecost Meditation

Zaccheus may have been among the tax collectors at the Baptism of Jesus. Luke 3:12 Jesus met with many tax collectors and publicans during his short three year ministry. In Luke 5:29, a Tax collector named Levi who became the Apostle “Matthew”, made Him a feast in his house with a great company of publicans. In Luke 7:34, Jesus was accused of eating and drinking with publicans. In Luke 15:1, “All of the publicans drew near to hear Him.” It would be difficult to believe Zacchaeus only knew of Jesus; they likely knew each other personally. How did Jesus know who that person was in the tree? After all, He called him by name!  Read more


Year C Twenty-Third Sunday After Pentecost Meditation

The story is a simple one. Two men are in the Temple for prayers, one a Pharisee and the other a Tax collector. The Pharisee prays to himself about how faithful he is. He is not at all like the tax collector. The tax collector merely prays, “Lord have mercy upon me a sinner.” He leaves justified and the other not. The Pharisee is not much different than some in America. They see themselves as religious people. They are rich enough to follow all the laws. However, they do all they can to legalistically not follow the laws. They hate paying taxes and they see themselves as patriots. They are not thieves, rogues, adulterers, or even like the tax collecting traitor.  Read more


Year C Twenty-Second Sunday After Pentecost Meditation

Literal thinking sees this parable as a comparison between and the unjust judge and the God of justice. The parable of the widow and the recalcitrant judge is about the need to always pray and not to lose heart. Literal prayer needs to be persistent. Things to do are to say prayers, sing praise hymns, take communion and go on retreats. The problem is, that is not how it works. You can pray prayers, and not pray, sing praise hymns and not praise, be stuffed with Eucharistic bread or go on retreats and not be in communion with God. If it does not work once, it does not work at all. Jesus likes to quote Isaiah, “In vain you worship me. You worship with your lips but your heart is far from me.”  Read more


Year C Twenty-First Sunday After Pentecost Meditation

Did you catch the point of this story? Granted there are many minor points. There is the healing of the lepers, the one who came back to give thanks. There is Jesus telling him that his Faith has made him whole. What is the big point? Did you miss it?  Read more


Year C Twentieth Sunday After Pentecost Meditation

Grace understanding is about what faith is. It is not belief. Faith is the experience of the Presence of God’s grace in our life. The purpose of what Jesus told the disciples was to get them to pay attention to the faith they already had available to them. The disciples were right there with Jesus and were not open to the Presence of the grace of God. They, like us, cannot increase what unconditionally and inclusively is in all of us.  Read more


Year C Nineteenth Sunday After Pentecost Meditation

In the story of Lazarus and the rich man, Lazarus mad it to Heaven and the rich man didn't. Why was Lazarus saved? What good did he do to deserve heaven? There is no evidence he was a believer. He may not have done anything evil, but he probably did not do much that was good. He did suffer much. Some Churches might say he did not have a snowball’s chance in Hell of making it to Heaven. Then why did Jesus have him make it?  Read more


Year C Eighteenth Sunday After Pentecost Meditation

Literal thinking deals with what is written to discover how to think. Grace understanding deals with how to think to discover what is written. The literal starts with what it reads to discover the spiritual meaning. Grace starts with the spiritual feeling of being in the Presence before it starts to read. The Parable is about a rich man who finds his servant is cheating him of his profits. Jesus summarized the parable by saying, “I tell you, make friends for yourselves by means of dishonest wealth so that when it is gone, they may welcome you into their eternal homes.” Some people are shocked because it seems as if Jesus is commending the shrewdness of the servant in cheating his master.   Read more


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